Keynote lecture session 2021

24 February 2021

  • days
  • Hours
  • Minutes

Chair and moderators

Stefano Ghio, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Italy
Paul Yu, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA
Reda Girgis, Michigan State University, USA
Horst Olschewski, Medical University of Graz, Austria



Agenda

  • Martin Cowie // mHealth and wearables: Is this the dawn of a new age for cardiovascular medicine?
  • Jason Yuan // Professor Sheila Glennis Haworth Memorial Lecture - Translational Research on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
  • Marc Humbert // Biomarker Analysis of the PULSAR Study: An Ongoing Phase 2, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Sotatercept (ACE-011) Versus Placebo When Added to Standard of Care for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH)
  • Raymond Benza // Switching from PDE5i to riociguat in patients with PAH: The REPLACE study
  • Niamh Errington // A diagnostic miRNA signature for pulmonary arterial hypertension using a consensus machine learning approach (Rupert Swift Award 2021)

Congratulations to Niamh Errington, who has been awarded the Rupert Swift Award 2021 for her abstract entitled: ‘A diagnostic miRNA signature for pulmonary arterial hypertension using a consensus machine learning approach.’

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A deeper look

We are very pleased to announce the second virtual meeting of the live and interactive PVRI event series 2021/2022, which will take place on February 24, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. GMT. In this WEBINAR 2, we are delighted that Prof Martin Cowie (IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON, UK) will give a keynote lecture via online livestream on “New insights of mobile health (mHealth) and its impact on cardiovascular medicine”, a timely topic of utmost importance for all of us. Prof Cowie is worldwide renowned speaker on this topic, serves as Chair of Cardiology (Health Services Research) at the National Heart & Lung Institute, and serves as a Non-Executive Director of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England. Wearable sensors connected to smartphones, point-of-need diagnostic devices and medical imaging powered by real-time data streams and supported by automated tools to aid clinical decision-making potentially enable care and improve our understanding of physiological variability. However, the path to incorporation of mHealth into clinical care is still fraught with challenges, and Prof. Cowie will provide us a “state-of-the-art” update on where we stand in 2021, and what we may expect in the near future.

This presentation is followed by a second keynote lecture, the “Professor Sheila Glennis Haworth Memorial Lecture” given by Prof Jason Yuan (UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO, USA) which will highlight “New aspects of translational research on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)”. Prof Yuan is Professor of Medicine at UCSD in La Jolla, CA. He will focus on novel mechanistic insights in pulmonary vascular disease and their potential future clinical application.

In addition to these first-class lectures, the best abstracts will be presented and discussed. This includes current issues such as the occurrence of venous and arterial thromboembolism in COVID-19 patients as well as tricuspid regurgitation as a proxy for acute pulmonary hypertension and its connection with the short-term outcome in severe COVID-19.

 

mHealth and wearables: Is this the dawn of a new age for cardiovascular medicine? 

15:00-15:30 GMT

Presenter: // Martin Cowie, Imperial College London, UK

This talk will describe the challenges and opportunities of digital health as it applies to cardiovascular medicine. A digital phenotype can now be created for each of us, but the key question is can we extract value from more and more data?  Can we make better decisions that improve outcome and experience of care using mhealth and wearables, or will we just be swamped by a tsunami of continuous data streams?  Where does AI and machine learning fit in?  How should we re-organise our work flows? A brief review of some key studies, and the challenges ahead will be presented, leaving time for questions and interaction.

  

Professor Sheila Glennis Haworth Memorial Lecture

Translational Research on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

15:40-16:10 GMT

Presenter: // Jason Yuan, University of California San Diego, USA

It is a great honor and a privilege to give the Sheila Glennis Haworth Memorial Lecture. Professor Haworth was a great advocate for translational research, a strong supporter for the journal Pulmonary Circulation, a role model for young physicians and investigators, and a true leader for the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. This lecture is dedicated to Professor Haworth for her life-long academic and clinical destination: find a cure for pediatric and adult pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Pulmonary circulation is normally a low-resistance and low-pressure system. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is a function of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR): PAP = CO × PVR. PVR is inversely proportional to the fourth power of the intraluminal radius (r) of pulmonary artery. Regardless of initial pathogenic triggers, there are four major causes for the elevated PVR and PAP: sustained vasoconstriction, concentric pulmonary vascular remodeling (or wall thickening), in situ thrombosis (or occlusive intimal lesions), and increased pulmonary vascular stiffness.

Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal and progressive disease in which increased PVR/PAP, if untreated, lead to right heart failure and death. Regardless of initial pathogenic triggers, sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, in situ thrombosis, and increased pulmonary vascular stiffness are the major causes for the elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) in patients with PAH.

An increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction by causing PASMC contraction and a critical stimulus for concentric pulmonary vascular remodeling by causing PASMC contraction and migration. Abnormality in handling cytosolic Ca2+ in other types of pulmonary vascular cells, such as pulmonary arterial and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and (myo)fibroblasts, and circulating cells (e.g., neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages) is also implicated in the development of vascular remodeling and thrombosis.

Membrane receptors, e.g., G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and tyrosine receptor kinases (RTK), are functionally coupled to various ion channels (e.g., Ca2+-permeable cation channels) to regulate [Ca2+]cyt in PASMC and other types of lung vascular cells upon binding to their ligands (e.g., vasoconstrictive and mitogenic agonists, and growth factors). In addition, there are K+ channels expressed in the plasma membrane that contribute to the regulation of membrane potential, cell excitability and volume which subsequently contribute to modulation of PASMC contraction, migration, proliferation, and apoptosis.

This presentation focuses on the discussion of our major findings that link ion channels and membrane receptors to the development and progression of PAH using cells and tissues isolated from patients with PAH and animals with experimental PH. The presentation will also provide an overview on the pathogenic mechanisms related to Ca2+ signaling and intracellular signaling cascades associated with PASMC contraction, migration, proliferation and apoptosis.  Furthermore, the presentation will discuss the potentials to develop novel therapeutic approaches by targeting specific receptors and cation channels to treat PAH and pulmonary vascular disease in general.

 

Best abstract

16:20-16:28

Presenter: // Marc Humbert

Abstract topic: // Biomarker Analysis of the PULSAR Study: An Ongoing Phase 2, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Sotatercept (ACE-011) Versus Placebo When Added to Standard of Care for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH)

 

Best abstract

16:32-16:40

Presenter: // Raymond Benza

Abstract topic: // Switching from PDE5i to riociguat in patients with PAH: The REPLACE study

 

Best abstract

16:44-16:52

Presenter: // Niamh Errington

Abstract topic: // A diagnostic miRNA signature for pulmonary arterial hypertension using a consensus machine learning approach (Rupert Swift Award 2021)

 

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