05 February 2018 by Gabriel Diaz

Long follow up of children with pulmonary hypertension (ph) at altitude. the importance to live at low altitude

Introduction

Due to the effect of Hypobaric Hypoxia, altitude gives special characteristics to PH.

Objective

To show the evolution and some characteristics of PH during long follow ups of children with PH, diagnosed at early age in Bogota located at 2.640 meters OSL.

Material and Methods

20 patients were diagnosed with PH confirmed by catheterism during childhood. The majority had cardiac control at least every year. Were recommended to live at low altitude.

Results

Median age at diagnosis: 3.6 years (1day-7years). IPH: 14 patients, 10 Females;. ES: 3; VSD+PH: 2; Talasemia: 1. FOLLOW UP: Median: 10.1 years (0,5-34 years). Patients with VSD or ES are alive. 15 patients could go to live at low altitude; 11 are alive. IPH: 7 (50%) died; the median of follow up of the other 7 patients is 15.4 years. Last years some patients received vasodilators.

Discusion

In this serie of cases with severe PH and long follow up similar to other recent findings at same altitude, the main cause was IPH (70%). Of this group, patients that could not go to live at low altitude died (3), from patients with IPH that could go to live at low altitude 7 are alive and much better, while 4 died. The 5 patients with ES or VSD and severe PH are alive; however the patients that could go to live at low altitude have better FC.

Conclusion

In altitude the main cause of severe PH is IPH. Patients with IPH that could not go to live at low altitude died very soon, while the majority of patients with IPH that could go to live at low altitude, could have long follow up with good FC: I-II. All patients with ES or VSD and PH are alive; however, patients that live at low altitude have better FC.

Key Contributors

Gabriel F. Díaz G., Alicia Márquez Universidad Nacional de Colombia, CPO


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